There's More to Fishing than Fishing

There's More to Fishing than Fishing

Posted: Updated:
Six-hundred Channel Catfish were let loose into the Concho River Downtown today.

Poles were equipped with shrimp on stand-by as the Texas Parks and Wildlife trailer backed down the ramp of the Concho River. The catfish flapped around after they were freed.

“They dropped them today… yeah," four-year old Phillip Michael Burks spent the day with his eight-year old sister Denay Burks and their mom.

“See how fun you have and have time with your family,” Denay said.

While Denay enjoyed high-fiving and just being in their company, Phillip had his eye on the prize, “I'm going to catch a catfish... yeah..”

Willie Gonzales says he too enjoys fishing but loves seeing when parents get their kids hooked on a positive hobby, “Keep them off the streets. It's all up to the family to grow the kid the way it’s supposed to be.”

The Burks’ spend almost every weekend on the river, Denay enjoys it, “It’s better when you’re outside instead of being inside and don’t get to learn anything.”

Again, Denay is taking away the bigger lesson in it all, while Phillip has his eye on the prize. “We kill them today... we save them to eat…”

And he’s not the only one, Gonzales said, “I clean them and eat the heck out of them.”

But some are more about the catch and release, “A lot of people come down here, bring their kids down here. Spend time with them. But like me, I’m a cancer patient. I come out here when I feel like it.”

Johnny Hernandez thinks that Texas Parks and Wildlife is doing an amazing job reeling kids in with their neighborhood fishing program, but for Denay and Phillip, they're not there yet, but they will eventually learn what affect it casts on their future.

Every other Friday from here on out for the rest of the season, Parks and Recreation will restock the river with catfish.

Powered by WorldNow