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June is World Infertility Awareness Month. Here's a look at resources in the Carolinas for families trying to conceive

12% of women ages 15 to 44 in the US have difficulty getting pregnant or carrying the pregnancy to term, according to the CDC.

CHARLOTTE, N.C. — Parenthood is said to be one of the greatest journeys in life. But for some, becoming pregnant is a journey in itself. 

June is World Infertility Awareness Month, highlighting the struggle that couples go through in trying to conceive. It turns out, some women struggle with this more than others.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 12% of women ages 15 to 44 in the US have difficulty getting pregnant or carrying the pregnancy to term, and Julius Varzoni with Brown Fertility says there are disparities on who is most affected.

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"About 11.5% of African American women as opposed to 7% of white women," Varzoni explains. "More African American women suffering from infertility, and less reaching out for help. There’s also research that shows African Americans seek infertility treatment at a much lower rate than white women.”

Varzoni says Black women can have more trouble for several reasons, including being more at risk for uterine fibroids. But there are ways to get help.

The organization Fertility for Colored Girls is bringing back the Gift of Hope Award grant, which was suspended in 2020 due to the pandemicThe award is offered once a year and provides up to $10,000 to infertile families who may qualify to get the help they need.

Complete applications must be submitted by Friday, June 18th for this grant.

Click these links for lists of available infertility grant opportunities for all families with different circumstances in North and South Carolina.

Contact Lana Harris at lharris@wcnc.com and follow her on Facebook, Twitter and on Instagram.